Dutch Mountain

  • Sustainable residence, partly built underground.
  • A glass facade to the south allows the heat inside in winter while a canopy repels direct summer sunlight.
  • The house uses PV panels for electricity and a wood pellet boiler for heating.

This house in the city of Huizen was realised by the owner-architect amidst the beautiful Goois Nature Reserve in the Netherlands.

Together with the architect, Arup integrated sustainable solutions into the design without sacrificing comfort nor the architectural experience.

The house is embedded in the landscape, partly built underground. As a result, external weather impacts are reduced and this saves fuel costs significantly. The prominent glass facade to the south allows the heat inside in winter. The passive solar energy is fully used and stored in the concrete structure. The canopy repels direct summer sunlight.

The building uses PV panels to generate electricity, the surplus charges the electrical transport. The house has no gas and is heated by waste wood in a wood pellet boiler.

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  • Dutch Mountain, exterior view. Credit: John Lewis MarshallOpen gallery

    The prominent glass facade to the south allows the heat inside in winter.

  • Sustainability. Credit: denieuwegeneratieOpen gallery

    Sustainable solutions are integrated without sacrificing comfort nor the architectural experience.

  • Dutch Mountain, exterior view. Credit: John Lewis MarshallOpen gallery

    The house is embedded in the landscape, partly built underground.