Retrofitting existing homes for adaption to climate change

  • Research assessed options for adapting existing homes to climate change.
  • Evaluated effectiveness of technical solutions and included costed case studies.
  • Looked at how to encourage people to retrofit their homes and at which sectors have a role to play.


Households will be particularly affected by climate change, which will include uncomfortable summer heat waves and more frequent and severe floods and periods of drought. Bringing together expertise from across Arup, this research project assessed options, costs and benefits for adapting existing homes to cope with the effects of climate change.

Across London, the East and the South East of England, the project looked at the climate change impact of flooding, water stress and overheating in the current climate and that predicted for the 2050s. It also incorporated three costed case studies.

Arup's research specialists evaluated the effectiveness of the technical options available. They also looked at how policy makers could encourage six million homeowners across the three regions to retrofit their homes. This included holding a series of consultation forums.

Expert input was drawn from a number of disciplines and practices at Arup, including water, flood risk assessment, public health, environmental physics, building engineering, sustainability, residential buildings, energy, architecture and quantity surveying.

The project was well received, and the report for policy makers - 'Your home in a changing climate' - was launched at City Hall by Nicky Gavron (then Deputy Mayor of London) and Joan Ruddock (then Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Climate Change) in February 2008.

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  • City rooftops - Cover of final report on retrofitting existing homes for climate change adaptation – ‘Your Home in a Changing Climate’Open gallery

    The project assessed options, costs and benefits for adapting existing homes to cope with the effects of climate change.